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Anim Mentor Term 1 Poses

*Sexy kitty growl*

*Sexy kitty growl*

You’re a tiger baby, yeah! That’s the Austin Power’s photoshoot vibe I was trying to channel in my first assignment with Animation Mentor (above).

As I’ve mentioned in previous posts, I said I would post the 7 poses I created in term 1. I finally got around to rendering them and compiling the initial version of the pose (on the bottom) with the final version after peer and mentor critique.

‘Free Pose’ Critique: Separate the shoulder from the head, avoid 2 straight arms, make the screen right hand support the body better and simplify the feet/leg shape.

AM_T1_excited

Tee hee!

“Ooh, mint ice cream!” turned into “ZOMG butterfly!”

‘Excited’ critique: Avoid twinning with the arms and legs, revise the balance of the pose and revise the line of action in the body.

AM_T1_devastated

What do you mean there are no Snickers pods left!?!?

Yes, this is how I feel when I check the cupboard and my chocolate stash has been obliterated – possibly by myself (possiblyat2aminthemorning) – but still, WHY IS THE CHOCOLATE GONE!?

‘Devasted’ critique: Rotate the screen left hand to hang more naturally, align the hips more to the right over the feet and make the screen right leg flow into the torso smoothly.

AM_T1_strength

There’s a good energy in the gym!

Cue the Rocky music.

‘Strength’ critique: Bend the lower body down more, watch the negative space of the feet and revise the placement of the rings.

AM_T1_concerned

If you’re wondering why little Jimmy is so upset, it’s not just because he lost the game for his team – his chocolate stash is also empty.

‘Concerned’ critique: Simplify the pose of the child to draw attention back to the adult, rotate the screen right arm back.

AM_T1_exhausted

My uni life in CG.

Snorlax much?

‘Exhausted’ critique: Get rid of the negative space between the chair arm and and the legs, and between the head and the couch.

AM_T1_balance

Looks like the beginning of “YYYYYY-M-C-A!”

‘Balance’ critique: Bring the body more screen left over his hand.

And there will be plenty more poses at the end of this term with awesome new rigs!

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3-Point Belt Review Vol.6: Bear With Me

Marky Mark learns a lesson.

Marky Mark learns a lesson.

Ted (Seth MacFarlane, 2012) *WARNING – TERRIBLE PUNS*

Guess Who's Back?

Ted’s ballin’. DON’T FORGET IT. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

1. Ted himself is balllllllin’! That’s what the rapper 50 Cent would say. That bear is brilliantly composited into the shot. Then Fiddy would invite Mark Wahlberg to his Candy Shop to tell him –

2. “Yo Marky Mark, you’re bear-ly making eye contact”. Seriously Mark, haaaavveee you met Bob Hoskins? He could make “eye-contact” with a 2D Roger Rabbit, why can’t you make eye contact with Ted? I mean, he’s right next to you on the cou- what? Whadda ya mean Ted’s not really there? He’s a mo-capped CG character?! THAT’S IMPAWSIBLE!

3. Ok, not to have a grizzly view on everything, but the sound is tinny and the plot is bear-ly there. It’s one of those stories where you can’t totally identify the obstacles. You start losing focus and thinking about what’s for dessert. Pretty claw-ful right? If MacFarlane had just thought about building a paws-ible climax, I wouldn’t be stuffed from my distracting brownie dessert; I’d be all stitched up from paying attention to the jokes along the way.

“Hey Stephanie, hit us with one more terrible teddy bear pun.”

Ursus arctos middendorffi /kodiak bear/ Kodiakbär

Someone maul her. Make it stop. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Fur sure. What to do you want to hear?

 

3-Point Belt Review – Vol. 1

TPBVol1_eyes

Hey boys and girls! Strap in. It’s time for a movie review!

The 3-Point Belt Review will be my attempt at being sooper edumacated about what’s hot and what’s not in VFX. Basically, each film only gets 3 observed points. Only 3. Because I don’t like long movie reviews. I’m generation Y. Me need instant gratification NOW! [Slams fists down]. Let’s cut to the cheese people.

Independence Day (Roland Emmerich, 1996):

  1. Miniatures and kabooms (pyrotechnics) = awesome!
  2. Respectful use of CG where props can’t be used.
  3. Damn good writing. In the words of the South Park police: “Nice”.

Hugo (Martin Scorsese, 2011)

  1. The CG melts into the sets beautifully due to well-planned VFX.
  2. Set design and the props – perfetto! Fantastically whimsical and true to steampunk.
  3. You know those cupcakes that look really delicious with all that icing and sprinkles but taste like plastic headphones? That was the writing/editing/directing. TERRIBLE pacing, disjointed plot and characters lacked depth. Ugh.

Who Framed Roger Rabbit (Robert Zemeckis, 1988)

  1. Seamless integration between 2D elements impacting the real world.
  2. The most convincing interactions don’t occur physically but through EYE CONTACT WITH A CARTOON BUNNY.  I doff my hat to you Bob Hoskins.
  3. Campy but it has a clear plot and motivations, plus Doc from Back to the Future.

E.T (Steven Spielberg, 1982)

  1. Excellent mechanical puppetry and props (aha!) to Matthew DeMeritt for walking on his hands in the suit for some scenes.
  2. Fairly convincing green screen and spaceship, which is remarkable for its time.
  3. Confusing character motivations and acting at times. In other words, the Mum is really weird. Why are you so negligent? She needs Dr Phil to tell her to get real.

Ben-Hur …..errr, I mean Argo (Ben Affleck, 2012):

Ben-Hur (William Wyler, 1959) was a bit scratched and around the cool rowing scene, it became unwatchable. So we watched Argo instead, and –

  1. For whatever VFX is in there, it’s subtle and unnoticeable. The illustrated storyboard intro also immediately piqued my interest.
  2. Yes, it was AWESOME!
  3. No, it is not completely true to facts. Don’t cry about it. If you want a doco, go watch angry polar bears with Sir David Attenborough or something.